Masking Unmasked- Pg2- Giordan On Graphics | WebReference

Masking Unmasked- Pg2- Giordan On Graphics

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Chapter 15

Continued...

In addition to the Exposure control, there is also a tonal range pop-up menu that offers a choice between Highlights, Midtones, and Shadows. This setting determines the tonal range in the image that is affected by the Dodge tool. Set it for shadows to lighten only the shadows, ignoring the highlights and midtones.

The step-by-step lessons that follow illustrate how you can use these tools.

Using the Dodge tool

1. Double-click the Dodge tool to select it and open the Options palette.

2. Select Highlights from the Options palette pop-up menu and set the Exposure to 10.

3. With an appropriate sized brush selected, brush in circles over the light areas in the image, creating a bleached effect (see Figure 15.3).

FIGURE 15.3 Lighten the foreground of the image with the Dodge tool.


If the tool doesn't seem to be working... If using the Dodge or Burn tool seems to have no effect on your image, check the Exposure and tonal range settings in the Options dialog box. If the pop-up menu is set to Shadows and you're working on a light area, the tool will have no effect. In addition, if the Exposure setting is set very low, the effect could be very slight and gradual, giving the appearance of having no effect at all.

The Burn tool works in the opposite way of the Dodge tool, making the image darker rather than lighter. In the darkroom, photographers would take a piece of cardboard, poke a rough hole in it, and shine the light of the enlarger only on the areas that needed to be darkened. The Burn tool operates in the same way (minus the cardboard and the enlarger of course).

The Options palette for the Burn tool shows the same controls as the Dodge tool, offering the ability to control the Exposure and specify a tonal range to be effected.

Using the Burn tool

1. Select the Burn tool from the Dodge/Burn/Sponge pop-up menu and double-click the Burn tool to open the Options palette.

2. Select Shadows from the Options palette pop-up menu, and set the Exposure to 10.

3. With an appropriate sized brush selected, brush in circles over the dark areas in the image, toning down the shadows (see Figure 15.4).

FIGURE 15.4 Use the Burn tool to darken and saturate the shoes.

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URL: http://www.webreference.com/graphics/
Created: Nov. 16, 1998
Revised: Nov. 10, 1998