The Hidden Power of Photoshop Elements 3, Pt. 1 | 2 | WebReference

The Hidden Power of Photoshop Elements 3, Pt. 1 | 2

The Hidden Power of Photoshop Elements 3, Pt. 1.

Create the Red Component

First, create the red component:

1. Open the image you want to separate.

2. Duplicate the Background layer (Layer > Duplicate Layer). In the dialog box that appears, change the name of the layer to Red. Click OK.

You'll often need to return to the Background layer to extract different color information, so duplicating the Background layer at the start leaves you the original source to work from.

3. Make a fill layer by choosing Layer > New Fill Layer > Solid Color. Click OK. When the Color Picker dialog box appears, set the color to red (enter values: R = 255, G = 0, B = 0). Click OK. The image will be red; you'll fix that in the next few steps.

4. Set the fill layer mode to Multiply by selecting Multiply from the Blending Mode drop-down list in the upper left of the Layers palette. Multiply will effectively filter the color image for the red light information, isolating it (see the graphic pictured here).

5. Merge the layers by choosing Layer > Merge Down (Command/Ctrl+E) to commit the red filtering. You can turn this red light into a channel by adding equal parts of blue and green to the red in the following steps.

6. Duplicate the Red layer (Layer > Duplicate Layer). This creates a layer named Red Copy. You'll need it only temporarily, so there is no need to rename it. Click OK.

7. Make a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer by choosing Layer > New Adjustment Layer > Hue/Saturation. When the Hue/Saturation dialog box appears, use the sliders or type in the following settings: Hue: +120, Saturation: 0, Lightness: 0. This will change the color of the red component to green without affecting the tone. Click OK.

8. Merge the Hue/Saturation and Red Copy layers by choosing Layer > Merge Down (Command/Ctrl+E). This commits the change of color from red to green without affecting the tone.

9. Set the current layer mode to Screen by selecting Screen from the Blending Mode drop-down list in the upper left of the Layers palette. Screen mode acts by applying layer information as additive light.

10. Duplicate the Red Copy layer (Layer > Duplicate Layer). This creates a layer named Red Copy 2. Again, this is a temporary layer, so there is no need to rename it. Click OK.

11. Make a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer by choosing Layer > New Adjustment Layer . Hue/Saturation. In the Hue/Saturation dialog box, specify these settings: Hue: +120, Saturation: 0, Lightness: 0. This changes the color of the layer to blue. Click OK.

12. Merge the layers by choosing Layer > Merge Down (Command/Ctrl+E). This commits the change in color from green to blue-still not affecting the tone. The red filtered component is now in the Layers palette in equal parts of red, green, and blue (see the corresponding graphic). Combining them correctly (as you¡¯ll do in the next steps) will give you the red color channel as black-and-white tone.

You'll often need to return to the Background layer to extract different color information, so duplicating the Background layer at the start leaves you the original source to work from.

13. Activate the Red layer; then link it to Red Copy and Red Copy 2 by clicking the linking box for each copy layer.

14. Merge the linked layers by choosing Layer > Merge Linked. The result will be a singlelayer grayscale representation of the red light component in the original image. This is the same thing as the red channel. Your layers should look like this graphic.

Create the Green Component

Similar steps to creating the red component will help you extract the green component:

15. Hide the Red layer by clicking its layer visibility toggle (the eyeball icon) .

16. Activate the Background layer, duplicate it (Layer > Duplicate Layer), and rename the duplicate layer Green. Click OK.

17. Make a fill layer (Layer > New Fill Layer > Solid Color). The Color Picker dialog box appears. Set the color to green (R = 0, G = 255, B = 0). Click OK. The whole image will be green.

18. Set the layer mode of the Color Fill layer to Multiply to reveal the green light component of your image. Click OK. Your layers palette should look like the graphic that appears here.

19. Merge layers by choosing Layer > Merge Down (Command/Ctrl+E).

20. Duplicate the Green layer (Layer > Duplicate). The result will be a layer named Green Copy.

21. Make a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer (Layer > New Adjustment Layer > Hue/Saturation) with these settings: Hue: +120, Saturation: 0, Lightness: 0. This changes the color of the layer to blue.

22. Merge the layers by choosing Layer > Merge Down.

23. Set the layer mode to Screen by selecting Screen from the Blending Mode drop-down list in the upper left of the Layers palette.

24. Duplicate the Green Copy layer. This will result in a duplicate layer named Green Copy 2.

25. Make a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer with these settings: Hue: +120, Saturation: 0, Lightness: 0. This changes the color of the layer to red.

26. Merge the layers by choosing Layer > Merge Down. Your layer stack should look like this graphic.

27. Activate the Green layer, and then link it to Green Copy and Green Copy 2 by clicking the linking boxes of the copy layers.

28. Merge the linked layers (Layer > Merge Linked). This composites the layers into a single-layer grayscale representation of the green light component in the original image. Your layers should look like this graphic.

Created: March 27, 2003
Revised: November 30, 2004

URL: http://webreference.com/graphics/elements/1