Globalize your Web Applications: The Universal Character Set | 2 | WebReference

Globalize your Web Applications: The Universal Character Set | 2


[prev]

Globalize your Web Applications: The Universal Character Set [con't]

Other Special Characters

Before Unicode, HTML text was encoded according to ISO 8859/1 8-bit single-byte coded character set known as Latin-1. There are 256 character positions in the Latin-1 encoding, including the C0 and C1 control characters and characters from most Western European languages. Characters whose code is greater than 255 are likely to not be accessible from your keyboard, or some part of your system (i.e. translation software) may not be equipped to deal with 8-bit character codes. This is where the character and numeric references described above come into play.

The following five tables show some codes for Unicode characters from the Basic Latin encoding and other languages, whose codes can extend into the thousands:

Basic Latin   (0–127)

Character Entity Reference ! none none none
Numeric Character Reference ! 5 A a
Hexadecimal Character Reference ! 5 A a
Resulting Character ! 5 A a

Latin–1 Supplement   (128–255)

Character Entity Reference ¥ ¼ Ñ ñ
Numeric Character Reference ¥ ¼ Ñ ñ
Hexadecimal Character Reference ¥ ¼ Ñ ñ
Resulting Character ¥ ¼ Ñ ñ

Latin Extended-A   (256–383)

Character Entity Reference none none Š š
Numeric Character Reference Ą ą Š š
Hexadecimal Character Reference Ą ą Š š
Resulting Character Ą ą Š š

Greek   (880–1023)

Character Entity Reference Α Δ δ none
Numeric Character Reference Α Δ δ Ϡ
Hexadecimal Character Reference Α Δ δ Ϡ
Resulting Character Α Δ δ Ϡ

Arabic   (1536–1791)

Character Entity Reference none none none none
Numeric Character Reference ؟ ب حٍ ۳
Hexadecimal Character Reference ؟ ب حٍ ۳
Resulting Character ؟ ب حٍ ۳

These tables only cover a small number of available entity references. For a complete listing visit this HTML 4.0 Character Entity References page. W3Schools also has a full reference, but divided into three parts:

Original: January 4, 2010


[prev]