Color Theory / Color Schemes - Part 1 of Chapter 2 from Web Graphics for Non-Designers (1/6) | WebReference

Color Theory / Color Schemes - Part 1 of Chapter 2 from Web Graphics for Non-Designers (1/6)

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Web Graphics for Non-Designers, Chapter 2: Using Color

Color Theory

At the heart of basic color theory lie the three Primary colors: red, yellow, and blue:

Primary Colors

Combining these gives the Secondary colors of green, orange, and purple:

Secodary Colors

Subsequently, going a level deeper and the combination of a Primary and Secondary color gives us the Tertiary colors of red-orange, red-purple, blue-purple, blue-green, yellow-green, and yellow-orange:

Tertiary Colors

Tertiary colors are a form of intermediate colors, which are the result of further combinations from the color wheels presented. A color wheel shows these hues (as you will learn soon, a hue is a pure color) from which every other color is created.

Color Wheel

Every other color available for use on the web is a variation in tone, tint, or shade, each of which you will learn more about shortly. Combining natural hues with the neutral colors black and white (and the grays in between), gives these variations. From the definition of a hue that follows, you will learn that these neutrals have no hue.


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Created: December 2, 2002
Revised: December 2, 2002

URL: http://webreference.com/authoring/languages/html/definitive/1/