New Block Elements on the Block | WebReference

New Block Elements on the Block

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New Block Elements on the Block

The most basic block element is the P element, that denotes paragraphs. You'll use paragraphs to organize your documents all the time, and this is without a doubt the most often used element in HTML.

NameP
UsageParagraph
ContextThis is a block element
ContentsThis element may only contain inline elements and text.
Start-tagRequired
End-tagOptional
Attributes:
element identifiers
element title
style directives
event handlers
language attributes
text alignment attributes

We've also seen the heading elements, that are used to insert headings in documents. Headings are used to organize your document into logical sections, and should normally be nested properly (i.e. there should be level 1 headings that contain level 2 headings that contain level 3 headings etc.).

NameH1, H2, H3, H4, H5, H6
UsageHeading
ContextThis is a block element
ContentsThis element may only contain inline elements and text.
Start-tagRequired
End-tagRequired
Attributes:
element identifiers
element title
style directives
event handlers
language attributes
text alignment attributes

The BLOCKQUOTE element is used to insert a quotation from another source inside a document. The contents of a BLOCKQUOTE element are considered to be external from the current document and quoted from another source.

NameBLOCKQUOTE
UsageBlock Quotation from another text
ContextThis is a block element
ContentsThis element may contain block elements.
Start-tagRequired
End-tagRequired
Attributes:
element identifiers
element title
style directives
event handlers
language attributes
CITEURIURI of the document the quotation originates from

The CITE attribute is used to supply a URI for the document you are quoting. Here is an example of BLOCKQUOTE use:

<P>The most accurate definition of Object Transfirbulation is,
in my opinion, given by Dr. Arnold D. Propellerhead in his 
book on Transfirbulation:
<BLOCKQUOTE CITE="http://www.acme.com/OTP/"&gt
<P>Transfirbulation: The process under which an object's 
non-persistent firble state is altered.</P>
</BLOCKQUOTE>
<P>This should clear up any confusion on the subject.<P>

The most accurate definition of Object Transfirbulation is, in my opinion, given by Dr. Arnold D. Propellerhead in his book on Transfirbulation:

Transfirbulation: The process under which an object's non-persistent firble state is altered.

This should clear up any confusion on the subject.

The ADDRESS element is used to include contact information for the author of the document. It is usually placed at the bottom of the document and includes at least an e-mail address.

NameADDRESS
UsageAuthor contact information
ContextThis is a block element
ContentsThis element may only contain inline elements.
Start-tagRequired
End-tagRequired
Attributes:
element identifiers
element title
style directives
event handlers
language attributes
CITEURIURI of the document the quotation originates from

For example, you might want to include your name, address and e-mail like this:

<ADDRESS>
Comments to: <A HREF="mailto:arnold@acme.com">Dr. Arnold D. 
Propellerhead</A>, Acme Computer Corp., One Acme Road, 
AcmeTown, USA. 
</ADDRESS>
Comments to: Dr. Arnold D. Propellerhead, Acme Computer Corp., One Acme Road, AcmeTown, USA.

The HR element is used to insert a horizontal rule (that's a line for the less technical amongst us) in your document. It should be used as a separator and not just a visual enhancement as a horizontal rule can have meaning even in non-visual media.

NameHR
UsageHorizontal Rule (line)
ContextThis is a block element
ContentsThis is an empty element
Start-tagRequired
End-tagForbidden
Attributes:
element identifiers
element title
style directives
event handlers
language attributes
text alignment attributes
NOSHADEBooleanSpecifies that the rule should be drawn solid
WIDTHLengthSpecifies the width of the rule
SIZEPixelsSpecifies the height of the rule

These block elements are the fundamental building blocks of your document. Finally, let's take a look at some of the most important inline elements.

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URL: http://www.webreference.com/html/tutorial3/3.html
Created: June 25, 1998
Revised: June 25, 1998